Smithsonian admits to destruction of thousands of giant human skeletons in early 1900′s

Original article by Bob Flanagan

A US Supreme Court ruling has forced the Smithsonian institution to release classified papers dating from the early 1900′s that proves the organization was involved in a major historical cover up of evidence showing giants human remains in the tens of thousands had been uncovered all across America and were ordered to be destroyed by high level administrators to protect the mainstream chronology of human evolution at the time.

The allegations stemming from the American Institution of Alternative Archeology (AIAA) that the Smithsonian Institution had destroyed thousands of giant human remains during the early 1900′s was not taken lightly by the Smithsonian who responded by suing the organization for defamation and trying to damage the reputation of the 168-year old institution.

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During the court case, new elements were brought to light as several Smithsonian whistle blowers admitted to the existence of documents that allegedly proved the destruction of tens of thousands of human skeletons reaching between 6 feet and 12 feet in height, a reality mainstream archeology can not admit to for different reasons, claims AIAA spokesman, James Churward.

«There has been a major cover up by western archaeological institutions since the early 1900′s to make us believe that America was first colonized by Asian peoples migrating through the Bering Strait 15,000 years ago, when in fact, there are hundreds of thousands of burial mounds all over America which the Natives claim were there a long time before them, and that show traces of a highly developed civilization, complex use of metal alloys and where giant human skeleton remains are frequently found but still go unreported in the media and news outlets» he explains.

Original article by Bob Flanagan

New video: HeatStroke experiment

Just a quick experiment visualizing the HeatStroke tune:

I rendered the hi hat, snare, bass drum and sequencer tracks to separate audio files. Then modeled a drum kit in 3ds Max, applied a FumeFX modifier to each part. Then I used each audio track to determine the amount of fuel the component has. Simulated in relatively low detail due to time constraints, but the idea seems to work.